Brewing happiness one cup at a time.

Cold brewing Darjeeling, heaven in a cup.

by Niraj Lama May 31, 2013 0 Comments

The tradition of cold brewing tea is old. It is believed to have originated in Japan, where people just poured cold water over tea in a pitcher that was left to sit for hours in the coolest part of the house. The resultant brew was cool, smooth, full of flavor with very little bitterness.


The tradition of cold brewing tea is believed to have started in Japan.

Most people drink Darjeeling hot or at least warm. Because of its delicate character Darjeeling is hard to make iced tea out of - the ice greatly dilutes the tea, leaving very little flavor in the glass.

However, when we cold-brewed Darjeeling the results were stunning. The taste and the aroma of the tea were exquisite, and it flowed all over the palate with perfect clarity, every note clear and precise. Why had not one thought of it before?!
 
We tried cold brewing with all our first flush teas. We think the harvest’s floral sweetness perfectly complements the taste of a cold brew. The freshness of the tea also enhances the flavors.

For a cup we first tried brewing it in a kyusu.

The difference between a hot brew and cold brew tea can be pretty stark in case of say, Sencha, as we found. But what we like about cold brew Darjeeling is that the complexity of the flavor and aroma is retained. In that respect it is not a “lighter” brew than a hot cup of tea.

Pleased with the results we made a pitcher-full to last the whole day!

Instructions for cold brewing Darjeeling:

  •     Use a level teaspoon of tea per cup.
  •     Pour room temperature water over the tea.
  •     Stir gently to make sure all the leaves are wet.
  •     Leave it in the fridge for 6-8 hours.
  •     Strain the leaves.
  •     Your super delicious cold brew Darjeeling is now ready to be enjoyed!



For those of you who try Darjeeling cold brew we'd appreciate if you shared your results with us.

 




Niraj Lama
Niraj Lama

Author




Also in Blog

Location matters for a tea garden
Location matters for a tea garden

by Niraj Lama September 19, 2019 0 Comments

The quality of fine tea is dependent on many qualities, with sunlight, soil content, and elevation drastically effecting the finished product. A lesser known factor, however, is the direction a hill slopes while growing tea.

Read More

Tea Garden Visits - India Summer 2019
Tea Garden Visits - India Summer 2019

by Niraj Lama August 18, 2019 0 Comments

Two things I most love about my job - spending time with customers, and visiting the tea gardens back east. Every time I am driving around the hills where the tea is grown, the beauty of the place makes me feel utterly blessed that I can do this for a living.

Read More

India Trip, Summer 2019
India Trip, Summer 2019

by Niraj Lama August 16, 2019 0 Comments

I just got back from India after a two and a half week trip. Although it was not the intent but me and my travel companion, who in this case happened to be my 12 year old daughter, Tara, ended up "Chasing the Monsoons", like the travel writer Alexander Frater in his once popular book. And like Frater discovering -  in our case rediscovering - the overwhelming life force of India even as the heavens hosed down the sub-continent.

Read More