Brewing happiness one cup at a time.

Making a perfect cup/pot of Darjeeling

by Niraj Lama May 17, 2013 0 Comments

For a pot

Water quality is extremely important and will affect the taste of the tea. If possible try to use filtered or bottled water.

  • Boil water in a kettle – do not use a microwave oven as it will affect the brewing process.
  • Put approximately one teaspoon of tea for each cup into the tea pot.*
  • For larger leaf varieties use a tablespoon of tea.
  • After the water comes to a boil, pour it into the tea pot.
  • Let it brew for 3-5 minutes.
  • Pour into cups through a strainer.
  • Sit back and enjoy the soothing elixir!

*If you have time warm the tea pot by rinsing it with hot water before putting in the tea. It will help brewing high-grade teas to perfection. Better quality teas means you actually have to pay more attention in brewing it.  

For a cup

 

The best way to make a cup of tea is to use a single-cup infuser. This is the kind that fits right into cup and has more room, unlike a tea ball or a bag, for the leaves to unfurl and expand.

 

  • Warm the cup or mug (6­­-8oz) by rinsing it with hot water.
  • Place the infuser in the cup.
  • Put a tea spoon of tea into the infuser.
  • Pour freshly boiled water. Steep for 3-5 minutes.
  • Remove the infuser.
  • Your cup is ready.

 

Depending on your preference, you may add or lessen the amount of tea and vary the steeping times. With most Darjeeling tea you can start with a 3 minutes steep; extend to see if it makes the cup better.  

White tea can be brewed for up to seven minutes. Some teas can be steeped for a second round but need to be brewed longer.

One pound (500 g) yields approximately 200 cups of tea.




Niraj Lama
Niraj Lama

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